Category Archives: Entry Doors

Design Recipes for a Fun and Functional Entry

By: Laura Gaskill, Houzz Contributor

A well-designed entry helps propel you out the door in the morning, keeps you organized and gives visitors a hint at your personal sense of style. It’s a lot to ask from what’s often the smallest room in the house! Let these five examples of stylish and feature-packed entryways inspire you. Plus, get how-to tips to help achieve these looks at home and ideas for keeping this hardworking space tidy.

Playful Modern1. Playful modern. Set a lighthearted tone at the front door with a bold splash of citrusy colors, from lemon and lime to tangerine. The round mirror is a welcome touch, while a trio of woven pendants makes the most of a double-height ceiling.

Tidy tip: A half-console table is a smart space saver. Tuck one into even the narrowest of entry halls, and gain a spot to set your keys, mail and more.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: lemon yellow, lime green, tangerine
  • Bright and bold front door
  • Painted console table
  • Woven pendant lights
  • Flat-weave dhurrie rugBotanical Charm

2. Botanical charm. With its botanical wallpaper and simple furnishings, this entry radiates nature-inspired calm. And don’t think of a look like this only in the country — why not infuse your city apartment with relaxing rural pleasures?

Tidy tip: Hidden storage inside the bench seat and a row of pegs provide ample space to stash your belongings.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: mossy green, white, natural woods
  • Botanical wallpaper or art
  • Vase of cut ferns or a potted plant
  • Shaker-style peg rail
  • Natural-fiber rug
  • Ladder-back chair

Farmhouse Eclectic3. Farmhouse eclectic. With barn-style sliding doors made from reclaimed wood, a kilim rug underfoot and a modern George Nelson pendant light overhead, this entry covers a lot of ground designwise while managing to look utterly simple and comfy. The secret? It’s the power of three: The light is the most modern element, the barn door the most rustic, and the warm rug ties it all together.

Tidy tip: A closet for coats plus a credenza tucked in a nook make for ample storage in this entryway (luckies!), but if your entry lacks a closet, you can make a rustic-industrial coat rack with pipe fittings mounted on the wall.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: cream, white, spice red, natural wood
  • Reclaimed wood barn doors
  • Modern Bubble light
  • Kilim rug
  • White credenza
  • Handmade pottery

Midcentury Pop

4. Midcentury pop. A cherry-red door, pottery horse and oversize midcentury pool photo by Slim Aarons set a playful, party-ready tone in this entry.

Tidy tip: A low credenza is a great piece for the entryway since it offers ample hidden storage for quickly stashing items (the dog’s leash, paperwork), as well as a surface for holding keys and a bag (or a drinks tray at a party).

Get the look: 

  • Colors: cherry red, black, white, a dash of yellow
  • High-gloss front door
  • Oversize pool or beach photography
  • Midcentury-style credenza
  • Shiny chrome light fixture
  • Lacquer accessories in bright hues
  • Handmade pottery or sculpture

Art Gallery Chic5. Art gallery chic. Create a minimal oasis with smooth floors, putty-colored walls and a sleek bench — it’s all the better to draw eyes toward a special piece of art on the wall.

Tidy tip: If you love this look but need more storage, swap out the bench for a version with hidden storage inside or a low credenza.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: espresso, putty, gray
  • Bare floors
  • Sleek bench
  • Sculptural stool or side table
  • Potted succulent
  • Original painting

Related Articles:
See More Savvy Storage Benches
10 Tips for Creating a Welcoming Entryway
Add Color and Comfort to Your Entryway

Craftsman Front Doors Make an Entrance

By: Rachel Grace, Houzz Contributor 

This spring my husband and I are removing the old two-tone storm door and energy-inefficient glass front door on our home and replacing them with a single Craftsman front door. The upgrade has me breathless.

Known for its mathematical design, a typical Craftsman-style front door has three divided windows (known as lites) over a large ledge with dentil molding and three flat panels. Typically installed on houses with porches or porticos, the Craftsman door is too lovely to be covered by a storm door.

I’ve yet to decide if we will paint it à la FGY Architects or keep it natural like RW Anderson’s designs below; either way I am really looking forward to the major architectural upgrade it will provide.

How to Choose a Front Door

Goforth Gill’s lipstick-red Craftsman front door features a single lite rather than three divided ones. It also boasts two matching sides.

Goforth Gill Architects

On close inspection you’ll notice that this door features lites with detailed glass. Inspired by Frank Lloyd Wright’s designs, three leaded glass panels fancify this otherwise straightforward design.

RW Anderson Homes

Rich Eldorado stone and a wooden front door combine to create the warmest of warm entryways. Many Craftsman front doors have only a ledge and dentil molding on the exterior side of the door, much like this beauty.

Bill Fry Construction

Flanked by planters, windows and lanterns, this Craftsman entry couldn’t be more inviting. I especially love the white and gray color palette.

FGY Architects

Although this door has only two lites, it does feature bonus side lites and a decorative transom window, all with ornate leaded glass.

Harrell Remodeling, Inc.

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Update Your Home’s Exterior With Help From These Pros
All in the Details: Don’t Forget to Match Your Mailbox

Smart Solutions for Nonexistent Entryways

By: Laura Gaskill, Houzz Contributor

If you live in a home without an entryway in the traditional sense (that is, a nice, wide hall or an open foyer), I can feel your pain. Perhaps someday I will be lucky enough to have a formal entry with room for a full-size table, lamps, benches and all the works, but for now I must make do with what I have: a door that opens onto a sliver of wall, smack in the middle of my living room/dining room/office. Thankfully, smart solutions do exist for remedying a number of entryway challenges — so whether you have a very narrow hall or no hall at all, there are ways to make your space work efficiently and beautifully. Let’s get started.

MAK Design + Build Inc.

Dilemma: An Open Entryway

This is such a common scenario, especially in smaller homes: The front door opens directly into the main living space, with no defined foyer or hall. In this situation the challenge is creating a transition from outside to inside without breaking the flow of the rest of the space.

One smart solution is to use a console table behind a sofa positioned near the entry door. This creates the enclosed feeling of a hall and provides a place for mail, keys and bags.

If you prefer to keep the space open, try setting up a wall-mounted system near the door instead. A mirror hung above a floating cabinet is a foolproof combination. Having a few drawers is great for keeping messy piles of paper and other odds and ends out of sight.

Jennifer Grey Interiors

Another sleek and efficient option is to hang a row of hooks on the wall and place a boot tray on the floor below. If your space is small, don’t worry about not being able to accommodate tons of guests’ coats — those can go in another room (or on a rented rolling coatrack). A few hooks for daily use is all you really need. A market basket on one of the hooks can hold odds and ends.

If you have children, two rows of hooks are wonderful for corralling everyone’s gear. Having child-height pegs or hooks helps little ones gain independence, as they can reach to put their own coat away.

Dilemma: An Extremely Narrow Hall

With an entryway this narrow, a table (or even floating shelf) is out of the question. Use what little floor space is available to wrangle umbrellas in a chic holder, and attach a few small hooks to the wall to hold keys.

Photo credit: Ricci Shryock
Design details: In a tiny hall, you can use the surfaces to bring in color and pattern. Here, the patterned tile floor, pendant light and glossy black door paint dress up the space, and even the narrow radiator cover is used to hold a vase of flowers.

If your hall is a smidgen wider than the space above, you may have room for a full-length mirror or chalkboard propped against the wall. And if a full-width console table is too wide, look for a half table that attaches to the wall. If you are handy, you could even attempt your own DIY version with a wooden table.

Moroso Construction

Dilemma: The Door Opens Onto a Stairway

Many older homes have a formal entrance that opens directly onto the stairway, with no real space for a table. In this case you may want to redirect to a wider spot in the next room with a full table. Otherwise it’s time to put every little sliver of wall space to work.

If the stairs are very close by and you have little wall to work with, consider installing a wall bracket or a few decorative hooks on the stairway wall to hold essentials.

Barbara Egan - Reportage Photography

A wall-mounted coat tree is a smart idea for those with a bit more space beside the door — it adds personality and performs a necessary task, yet hardly takes up any space at all.

Tell us: What has been the biggest challenge in designing your entryway?

Related Articles:
Add a Console Table Near Your Front Door
Key Measurements for Entraces Great and Small
Display Your Rain Gear With a New Coatrack

Could the Inside of Your Front Door Use a New Color?

By: Janell Beals, Houzz Contributor

Painting the exterior of a home’s front door a distinctive color is one of the fastest ways to add character and enhance curb appeal. But too often that’s where the color stops, resulting in a missed opportunity to carry the improvement into the entry by painting the other side of the door as well. If this is the case at your home, consider extending the exterior door color inside — or select another hue that both coordinates with the exterior while setting the design tone for the entry.

Here’s an entry that’s simply bursting with happy personality, thanks in large part to the color of the door. Just imagine if the door was white — much of the impact and charm would be lost.

Built by Highland Custom Homes

Source: Built by Highland Custom Homes

When deciding where to stop the color, there’s no right answer. Paint just the door, the door and sidelights, or go all out and paint the door, sidelights and trim. Such is the case here, with Benjamin Moore’s Midnight Blue making a dramatic statement in this entry.

Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design

Source: Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design

Red is another top choice: From apple red to the brighter shade of ripe tomato here, it’s a color that brings a sense of excitement and energy.

Ramona d'Viola - ilumus photography

Source: Ramona d’Viola – ilumus photography

Here, Al Green by C2 Paint, a sophisticated yet edgy muted lime, stands out among the pale gray walls and white trim.

Feldman Architecture, Inc.

Source: Feldman Architecture, Inc.

Is there a favorite color you’d like to see enhancing the inside of your front door? Painting a door is a fairly simple one-day or weekend DIY job, depending on experience level. Here are the supplies and steps to get you on your way to a more colorful entry:

(Note: The steps will vary slightly depending on the door material and any previous paint, varnish or stain used on the door.)

Step 1. Begin by gathering your supplies: medium- and fine-grit sandpaper, tack cloth, painters tape, brush, adhesion primer and semigloss paint.
Step 2. Lightly sand the door to remove the top layer of varnish, paint or stain and give the surface a “tooth” for the primer to adhere to. Start with medium-grit sandpaper and finish with fine-grit; wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 3. Tape the door edges and any hardware, leaving only the surfaces to be painted exposed.
Step 4. Paint a layer of primer. Consider KILZ Adhesion Primer, designed to bond to a variety of tough-to-paint surfaces.
Step 5. Let the primer dry, then very lightly sand with fine-grit sandpaper.
Step 6. Wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 7. Apply the first coat of paint. This may be enough in many cases, or, depending on the color used, a second coat may be required for optimal results. If so, repeat steps 5 and 6, followed by the second coat.

Related Articles:
Browse Thousands of Stunning Entryway Photos
How to Paint Your Front Door
Revamp Your Curb Appeal With an Outdoor Wall Sconce

How to Choose a Front Door Color

By: Vanessa Brunner, Houzz Editorial Staff

Don’t let your home blend into the background — even if you’re not in the market for changing your exterior color scheme, a new coat of paint on your front door could be just the makeover your home needs.

Use our color guides to each color to learn which hue, from unexpected orange to bright yellow to elegant black, will work well on your exterior door.

Miller's Meadow Farm Entry

Yellow. Welcome visitors with a cheerful yellow front door. Often identified with happiness, high energy and warmth, a lively yellow can brighten otherwise gloomy exteriors.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Yellow

Hickory Lane

Deep red. If bright red feels too audacious for your home, deepen the hue for a more crimson tone. More refined and sophisticated than brighter reds, certain shades of this deep red can work almost as neutrals.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Deep Red

5609 Residence

Orange. Orange is one of those colors that can go wrong really quickly. But don’t let that stop you — with the right complementing tones, small doses of orange can look quite modern and welcoming.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Orange

Block House

Green. Play off your surrounding landscape or introduce a new, refreshing color by painting your front door green. Whether olive, mint or lime, there’s bound to be a shade of green that can fit into your exterior palette.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Green

Arcadia Exterior Remodel

Black. Always classic, glossy black doors make an elegant statement. Use other exterior accents to help tie a black door into the rest of your home’s design.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Black

More color guides: Color palettes, paint picks and more in the Houzz Color section

Related articles:
Could the Inside of Your Front Door Use a New Color?
Revamp Your Curb Appeal With a New Mailbox
Browse Thousands of Exterior Photo on Houzz

5 Bright Palettes for Front Doors

By Jennifer Ott, Houzz contributor, principal designer, Jennifer Ott Design

Nothing welcomes guests to your home better than a bold, beautiful color on the front door. Many people have no trouble picking out a fun color to paint the door, but don’t know what to do with the rest of the exterior. And what about the trim?

The key to working with bold colors is to limit them to elements you really want to stand out, which makes the front door the ideal place to feature a vibrant color. Then select supporting hues for the rest of the house that don’t try to compete for attention.

Check out these Houzz homes with delightfully colorful front doors, along with potential palettes that incorporate a bold front door hue with other exterior hues.

This acid yellow-green front door shouts “Come on in!” and works nicely with the natural wood siding. If you have no choice but to paint your siding, you could go with a cooler brown/taupe shade to set off the brighter hue of the door.

Example palette. Get the same effect with (clockwise from top left, all from Martha Stewart Living): Lagoon MSL125, Lamb MSL225 and Bayou MSL237.

Example palette: Clockwise from top left (all from Sherwin-Williams): Red Tomato SW6607, Iron Ore SW7069 and Cityscape SW7067.

Tell us: What color is your front door? What color would you like it to be?

Related articles:
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Five Homeowners Take Back Their Views

Masonite VistaGrande

VistaGrande doors are designed with 18 percent more glass than comparable products.

We are excited to announce the winners of the Take Back Your View Contest. These five – yes FIVE – people are getting brand new VistaGrande doors. Launched this year, the VistaGrande flush-glazed smooth fiberglass patio and entry doors are designed with approximately 18 percent more glass than comparable products so homeowners can truly enjoy their outdoor views.

These five winners submitted pictures of how their doors obstruct their beautiful outdoor views.

We are excited these homeowners now get to truly enjoy their views – and we get to be a part of that experience.

Thank you to everyone who submitted pictures of their obstructed views. Congratulations to the winners!

Masonite’s Belleville Smooth Entry Door Earns Consumers Digest “Best Buy” Rating

Belleville Smooth is one of just four fiberglass doors to earn distinguished label in recognition of materials, quality, and warranty.

TAMPA (August 26, 2015) – Consumers Digest, a publication that provides unbiased evaluations and recommendations across a range of product categories, designated Masonite’s Belleville® Smooth a “Best Buy” in its July report on entry and storm doors. Belleville Smooth is one of only four fiberglass doors to receive the Best Buy rating, which is determined through evaluation of materials, quality of construction, and warranty.

In its report, Consumers Digest highlighted Belleville Smooth as the least expensive fiberglass door with a polyurethane core and a lifetime warranty. “It also is the least expensive such model that has laminated veneer lumber stiles, which make the door stronger than are doors that use plain wood stiles,” the publication noted.

Belleville Smooth fiberglass entry doors are crafted with specially engineered fiberglass door facings for maximum protection and durability, along with a high-definition panel profile for authentic shadow lines and a square edge design for a wood-door appearance. The doors’ high-performance smooth surface is ideal for painting and is resistant to rusting and denting.

“Masonite’s entry and interior doors are crafted with an ideal combination of beautiful aesthetics, long-term performance, and value, and those qualities shine in our Belleville Smooth line,” said David Perkins, vice president of channel marketing for North America residential for Masonite International. “We’re honored to see those attributes recognized by Consumers Digest.”

Subscribers to Consumers Digest can access the full report at
For additional details on Belleville Smooth and an overview of available profiles and glass options, click here.

The Affordable Home Improvement That Adds More Value Than Anything Else

Masonite Exterior DoorIf you’re looking to add value to your home, look no further than the humble front door. According to the latest Cost vs. Value report, simply upgrading your entry door adds more value to the house than any other single home improvement project.

The annual report, a joint research project between Remodeling magazine and the National Association of Realtors, compares changes in how much home improvement jobs cost with Realtors’ perceptions of how those jobs influence a home’s price at resale. The exhaustive report is based on surveys of thousands of Realtors nationwide, looking at 36 popular remodeling projects and the value those projects retain at resale in 102 U.S. markets.

This year, entry doors ranked no. 1 in holding the most value—beating out other high-ticket home improvement projects such as bathroom and kitchen remodels and even master bedroom additions. In fact, when adding a steel entry door to the home, more than an average of 100 percent of the cost is recouped.

The report shows that no matter where you live in America, the cost of adding a door is minimal compared to the value it provides. In fact, based on national averages, a steel entry door costs $1,230 to install but adds $1,252 to the value of the home—for a cost vs. value of 102 percent. By comparison, a bathroom remodel that costs $16,724 has a resale value of only $11,707, or a cost vs. value of only 70 percent.

Wondering what a door upgrade will add to your home? Use the report’s regional drilldown to see how much value a front door adds to a home in your area.

Why are doors adding so much value? Experts say it comes down to two simple but increasingly powerful words in real estate: curb appeal. And few home improvements add as much bang for the buck as a front door. At the same time, as more people are looking to spruce up their home rather than move, upgrading the front door is an easy way to add new life to tired old designs. So if you’re looking to amp up your home’s exterior—and its value—let Masonite’s bevy of options help you step into a doorway of possibilities.

Design Inspiration from Unassuming Places: Masonite’s Interior and Exterior Doors Come to Life

Barrington Sierra AvantGuard Black Walnut 2 Panel Camber Top PlankVisitors at this year’s NAHB International Builders’ Show® are in for a new and innovative booth design and concept from Masonite®. In past tradeshows, booth designs have been simply constructed for designers to see the products, displayed in an orderly fashion. Unlike any other year, a circular configuration featuring a life like home designed booth will take its visitors right into what feels like home.

This “immersive experience” environment will present Masonite’s vision of doors as a piece of the overall aesthetic envelope and design of a home.

Each Masonite door will lead to various rooms designed to show the versatility in the brand’s interior and exterior doors. This allows designers to see the products while experiencing a demonstration of capabilities for Masonite® products.

Plan on attending? Expect two full-sized vignettes featuring products from several popular collections, including the Barrington®, Belleville®, AvantGuard®, Lemieux™ and Palazzo™ brands. While touring the vignettes, visitors will experience how Masonite doors can be integrated into everyday life and truly become a vital aspect of the architecture and design strategy.

Stop by Booth #C5008 for the experience. For more information, visit