Tag Archives: design

How to Open the Back of Your Home to the Yard

By Kate Burt, Houzz

A bank of sliding or folding glass doors is a lovely way to open up the back of your house to the garden, but there are reasons for choosing an alternative approach. Try the following ideas if, for example, you want to retain wall space, build in a window seat or keep some period character.

Paul Archer Design, original photo on Houzz

Supersize the windows. Maximizing light is often a big factor in the decision to open up the back of the house with wall-to-wall doors. But this cleverly designed living-dining space is wonderfully airy and bright, even with its traditional size and style of doors to the garden.

To the right, the addition, originally part of the side yard, was glassed in vertically and horizontally, flooding the dining area with light and creating a cozy window seat.

It’s important to talk to your designer about the orientation of your addition toward the sun if you’re considering this much glass. He or she can suggest provisions to ensure that you don’t create a greenhouse-like space.

Brian O’Tuama Architects, original photo on Houzz

Go deep. Rather than extending the glass doors across the entire back wall of this contemporary addition, the designer stopped short, using just three panels. The rest of the wall features a large window with a deep sill for a pleasant perch (especially for the resident feline).

Sonnemann Toon Architects, original photo on Houzz

Be repetitive. With all three sets of these pretty double doors open, you’d definitely be letting the outdoors in. This addition also features a skylight running left to right across the back of the room, bringing even more light into the space.

Although these are modern-style doors, the horizontal beading between the panes gives them a decidedly traditional look. This is a subtle way to highlight your home’s vintage or to draw attention to antique pieces.

Employ paint. One decorative benefit of choosing a more traditional exit into your garden is that wood will be an option —meaning you can paint it!

For a coherent exterior, consider painting your window frames to match your garden doors (or your doors to match your windows if you’re not ready for major redecoration).

Boscolo Interior Design, original photo on Houzz

Focus on the view. Who says thin-framed bifolds are the only way to highlight the view of your garden from indoors? This long, slim and contemporary kitchen has a sleek, monochrome color scheme. Choosing white for walls and doors makes them almost disappear — but not quite, which also adds character to the space.

Where light is limited, opting for reflective surfaces helps boost what you have by bouncing it around the room.

Consider metal frames. For a hit of character, think about steel door and window frames.

These windows, popular in the 1920s and 1930s, are a great choice for a house built between the wars. But don’t let yourself feel restricted by the idea of period authenticity — Crittall steel windows were invented in the late 19th century and are enjoying a revival of popularity across a raft of architectural styles.

Free up wall space. Restricting floor-to-ceiling doors to just one section of the back of your home also offers another opportunity: to use part of the wall for cabinetry. If you enjoy washing the dishes while gazing out the window, the benefits of this layout are obvious. It’s also a valuable consideration if you’re short on space — a whole wall of potential kitchen, for most of us, is a lot to give up.

If you prefer your frames to melt away visually, which can help expand a small or busy space, you might opt for having them made or painted in the same color as your walls.

Siobhan Loates Design Ltd, original photo on Houzz

Build in a dining nook. This split-level back room is a good-looking example of how traditional-style doors to your outdoor space can help you build a feature. The width is perfect for this circular dining table, and the view down on the garden below makes it a lovely spot for breakfast or lunch especially.

If your kitchen-dining room is raised and you have a balcony, consider installing a glass balustrade to ensure an uninterrupted view, as these homeowners have done.

Chris Snook, original photo on Houzz

Streamline your separation. The French doors in this double living room have a partner pair of doors to their right, in the kitchen-dining room.

Painting the bifold doors and the woodwork the same gray connects the elements of this room.

Maintaining two separate routes into and views across the garden gives your living space the opportunity to be a peaceful haven, with the kitchen-dining room a standalone household hub. To ensure that you retain two (or, as here, three) distinct lounging zones, be inspired by the way this homeowner made her dining area as comfy and cozy as possible, encouraging household members to linger for a while.

Choosing not to go totally open-plan is also a nice way to celebrate a house with pretty period features.

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Increase Light and Privacy With the Right Blinds and Window Shades
Browse Dining Room Tables for Your Dining Nook

Sensible Style for Your Holiday Foyer

By: 

Your entry foyer is your home’s welcome hug to guests. These sensible style suggestions are intended to help you make this important space warm, friendly, low-maintenance and accessible during this busy entertaining season.

Doorknobs are such a common element in our lives that we seldom think much about them. Yet, they create one of your home’s first impressions — and can be a barrier to entry for some. A traditional round doorknob is hard for someone with arthritis or Parkinson’s to operate. It’s also harder for someone with an armful of holiday gifts to operate. A lever-style door handle — both at your entry and from a powder room off that entry — will treat your holiday guests much more kindly.

Coat hooks are always helpful, but they become foyer MVPs when you lack a coat closet or need overflow space for a large crowd.

If your foyer doesn’t have a mirror, holiday time is an ideal time to add one. It will reflect your holiday décor and add light to the space. It will also give your guests a discreet opportunity to touch up their hair or makeup while you’re hanging up their coats.

A bench for removing and storing shoes during the soggy, busy holiday season will make your entry foyer better organized and protect your floors against the elements.

A foyer table is always helpful, but it’s especially welcoming to holiday guests juggling gifts, food carriers, wine bottles and flowers. Your well-coordinated table adds style to your entry and convenience for your company.

Art work sets the tone for your foyer. While it may only be seen in passing most of the year as you rush through your home, it’s likelier to be lingered over more as hellos and goodbyes are exchanged. You might consider rotating pieces in and out of your foyer — even collecting holiday-themed art work — for a cheerful gallery experience at home.

Let your foyer reflect the holiday season, too. Fragrant decorations in keeping with your home’s style will warmly welcome your guests. Be sure, though, that there’s still space on the table for them to set down bags while removing their coats or putting them back on.

Related links:

Design Recipes for a Fun and Functional Entry

By: Laura Gaskill, Houzz Contributor

A well-designed entry helps propel you out the door in the morning, keeps you organized and gives visitors a hint at your personal sense of style. It’s a lot to ask from what’s often the smallest room in the house! Let these five examples of stylish and feature-packed entryways inspire you. Plus, get how-to tips to help achieve these looks at home and ideas for keeping this hardworking space tidy.

Playful Modern1. Playful modern. Set a lighthearted tone at the front door with a bold splash of citrusy colors, from lemon and lime to tangerine. The round mirror is a welcome touch, while a trio of woven pendants makes the most of a double-height ceiling.

Tidy tip: A half-console table is a smart space saver. Tuck one into even the narrowest of entry halls, and gain a spot to set your keys, mail and more.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: lemon yellow, lime green, tangerine
  • Bright and bold front door
  • Painted console table
  • Woven pendant lights
  • Flat-weave dhurrie rugBotanical Charm

2. Botanical charm. With its botanical wallpaper and simple furnishings, this entry radiates nature-inspired calm. And don’t think of a look like this only in the country — why not infuse your city apartment with relaxing rural pleasures?

Tidy tip: Hidden storage inside the bench seat and a row of pegs provide ample space to stash your belongings.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: mossy green, white, natural woods
  • Botanical wallpaper or art
  • Vase of cut ferns or a potted plant
  • Shaker-style peg rail
  • Natural-fiber rug
  • Ladder-back chair

Farmhouse Eclectic3. Farmhouse eclectic. With barn-style sliding doors made from reclaimed wood, a kilim rug underfoot and a modern George Nelson pendant light overhead, this entry covers a lot of ground designwise while managing to look utterly simple and comfy. The secret? It’s the power of three: The light is the most modern element, the barn door the most rustic, and the warm rug ties it all together.

Tidy tip: A closet for coats plus a credenza tucked in a nook make for ample storage in this entryway (luckies!), but if your entry lacks a closet, you can make a rustic-industrial coat rack with pipe fittings mounted on the wall.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: cream, white, spice red, natural wood
  • Reclaimed wood barn doors
  • Modern Bubble light
  • Kilim rug
  • White credenza
  • Handmade pottery

Midcentury Pop

4. Midcentury pop. A cherry-red door, pottery horse and oversize midcentury pool photo by Slim Aarons set a playful, party-ready tone in this entry.

Tidy tip: A low credenza is a great piece for the entryway since it offers ample hidden storage for quickly stashing items (the dog’s leash, paperwork), as well as a surface for holding keys and a bag (or a drinks tray at a party).

Get the look: 

  • Colors: cherry red, black, white, a dash of yellow
  • High-gloss front door
  • Oversize pool or beach photography
  • Midcentury-style credenza
  • Shiny chrome light fixture
  • Lacquer accessories in bright hues
  • Handmade pottery or sculpture

Art Gallery Chic5. Art gallery chic. Create a minimal oasis with smooth floors, putty-colored walls and a sleek bench — it’s all the better to draw eyes toward a special piece of art on the wall.

Tidy tip: If you love this look but need more storage, swap out the bench for a version with hidden storage inside or a low credenza.

Get the look: 

  • Colors: espresso, putty, gray
  • Bare floors
  • Sleek bench
  • Sculptural stool or side table
  • Potted succulent
  • Original painting

Related Articles:
See More Savvy Storage Benches
10 Tips for Creating a Welcoming Entryway
Add Color and Comfort to Your Entryway

11 Reasons to Paint Your Interior Doors Black

By: Fred Albert, Houzz Contributor

A few months ago I saw a quote from a designer espousing the beauty of black doors. I had never thought about painting my doors black before. But then, up until a few months ago, I had never considered painting my ceilings black, either. Then I wrote a piece for Houzz called 11 Reasons to Paint Your Ceilings Black, and I was an instant convert.

Black doors don’t seem quite as radical to me. But the results can be transformative. Take a look at the photos that follow, and see if you become a convert as well.

1. They’re classy. OK, let’s state the obvious right from the start: Black doors are elegant. A white door would have looked charming and cottage-y in this entry hall. But splash on a bit of ebony paint, and you have instant, drop-dead sophistication.

Tamara Anka
I love the way the black door is framed by the black walls in the foreground. Which leads me to reason No. 2 …

2. They’re wonderful at picking up other black accents in the room. If you’ve got black elsewhere in the room, a black door will repeat the color and make the space feel more cohesive.

I love the way the black door echoes the color of the bed frame in this room, giving the space a rich, masculine feeling.

The Yellow Cape Cod

Notice how in all these examples, the door casing was left white.

3. They’re good at making things disappear. Got a door you want to downplay? Black is great at disguising shortcomings (like a large slab door, if that’s not your style) so you don’t notice them.

Wow Great Place

Black doors work well in an open space like this, but avoid using them in a confined area with a confluence of doorways, as they can look chaotic.

4. They frame views. Just as a piece of art looks better if it’s framed, a view is enhanced if there is something in the foreground to set it off.

5. They’re good to a void. Notice I didn’t say “avoid,” I said “a void.” As in, if you’ve got a big fireplace that’s unlit 99.9 percent of the time, and a dark painting or flat-panel TV above it, a black door will help mitigate the impact of those big, black voids, so they don’t look as noticeable in the room.

Thom Filicia Inc.

This room looks fine now, but when the TV is turned off, there’s a big black hole in a fairly small space. The black door balances the void so the blank screen isn’t the only dark expanse in the room.

6. They make a stock door look special. Slap on some black paint, and a typical paneled door takes on an air of swanky elegance.

7. They don’t show fingerprints. How many times have you had to clean dark smudges around a doorknob? Black doors won’t repel dirt — but they won’t show it as readily, either.

8. They mark a destination. This black door is like a punctuation mark at the end of a sentence — it marks the end of the long hallway and provides a clear destination.

Brooke Wagner Design

9. They look great with dark floors. White doors would have been fine in this space. But I love the way the black doors extend that sultry, dramatic mood.

They also send a subtle message, suggesting that the spaces beyond are special. This would be a great way to keep out prying eyes if there’s not a clear distinction between public and private areas in your home.

10. They add shine to a room. Every room could use a touch of reflection, especially if the other elements are textured or neutral. A mirror is one solution. A shiny black door is another.

Use a satin finish for minimal sheen. Or go for broke and apply a clear polyurethane topcoat for maximum shine and protection.

11. They make a ceiling look taller. Contrast draws the eye, so a narrow black door draws the eye up, making a low ceiling look higher. This makes black doors especially useful in basements or other low-ceilinged spaces.

Related Articles:
Browse Interior Doors
Wake Up Your Woodwork with Black
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Smart Solutions for Nonexistent Entryways

By: Laura Gaskill, Houzz Contributor

If you live in a home without an entryway in the traditional sense (that is, a nice, wide hall or an open foyer), I can feel your pain. Perhaps someday I will be lucky enough to have a formal entry with room for a full-size table, lamps, benches and all the works, but for now I must make do with what I have: a door that opens onto a sliver of wall, smack in the middle of my living room/dining room/office. Thankfully, smart solutions do exist for remedying a number of entryway challenges — so whether you have a very narrow hall or no hall at all, there are ways to make your space work efficiently and beautifully. Let’s get started.

MAK Design + Build Inc.

Dilemma: An Open Entryway

This is such a common scenario, especially in smaller homes: The front door opens directly into the main living space, with no defined foyer or hall. In this situation the challenge is creating a transition from outside to inside without breaking the flow of the rest of the space.

One smart solution is to use a console table behind a sofa positioned near the entry door. This creates the enclosed feeling of a hall and provides a place for mail, keys and bags.

If you prefer to keep the space open, try setting up a wall-mounted system near the door instead. A mirror hung above a floating cabinet is a foolproof combination. Having a few drawers is great for keeping messy piles of paper and other odds and ends out of sight.

Jennifer Grey Interiors

Another sleek and efficient option is to hang a row of hooks on the wall and place a boot tray on the floor below. If your space is small, don’t worry about not being able to accommodate tons of guests’ coats — those can go in another room (or on a rented rolling coatrack). A few hooks for daily use is all you really need. A market basket on one of the hooks can hold odds and ends.

If you have children, two rows of hooks are wonderful for corralling everyone’s gear. Having child-height pegs or hooks helps little ones gain independence, as they can reach to put their own coat away.

Dilemma: An Extremely Narrow Hall

With an entryway this narrow, a table (or even floating shelf) is out of the question. Use what little floor space is available to wrangle umbrellas in a chic holder, and attach a few small hooks to the wall to hold keys.

Photo credit: Ricci Shryock
Design details: In a tiny hall, you can use the surfaces to bring in color and pattern. Here, the patterned tile floor, pendant light and glossy black door paint dress up the space, and even the narrow radiator cover is used to hold a vase of flowers.

If your hall is a smidgen wider than the space above, you may have room for a full-length mirror or chalkboard propped against the wall. And if a full-width console table is too wide, look for a half table that attaches to the wall. If you are handy, you could even attempt your own DIY version with a wooden table.

Moroso Construction

Dilemma: The Door Opens Onto a Stairway

Many older homes have a formal entrance that opens directly onto the stairway, with no real space for a table. In this case you may want to redirect to a wider spot in the next room with a full table. Otherwise it’s time to put every little sliver of wall space to work.

If the stairs are very close by and you have little wall to work with, consider installing a wall bracket or a few decorative hooks on the stairway wall to hold essentials.

Barbara Egan - Reportage Photography

A wall-mounted coat tree is a smart idea for those with a bit more space beside the door — it adds personality and performs a necessary task, yet hardly takes up any space at all.

Tell us: What has been the biggest challenge in designing your entryway?

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Could the Inside of Your Front Door Use a New Color?

By: Janell Beals, Houzz Contributor

Painting the exterior of a home’s front door a distinctive color is one of the fastest ways to add character and enhance curb appeal. But too often that’s where the color stops, resulting in a missed opportunity to carry the improvement into the entry by painting the other side of the door as well. If this is the case at your home, consider extending the exterior door color inside — or select another hue that both coordinates with the exterior while setting the design tone for the entry.

Here’s an entry that’s simply bursting with happy personality, thanks in large part to the color of the door. Just imagine if the door was white — much of the impact and charm would be lost.

Built by Highland Custom Homes

Source: Built by Highland Custom Homes

When deciding where to stop the color, there’s no right answer. Paint just the door, the door and sidelights, or go all out and paint the door, sidelights and trim. Such is the case here, with Benjamin Moore’s Midnight Blue making a dramatic statement in this entry.

Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design

Source: Massucco Warner Miller Interior Design

Red is another top choice: From apple red to the brighter shade of ripe tomato here, it’s a color that brings a sense of excitement and energy.

Ramona d'Viola - ilumus photography

Source: Ramona d’Viola – ilumus photography

Here, Al Green by C2 Paint, a sophisticated yet edgy muted lime, stands out among the pale gray walls and white trim.

Feldman Architecture, Inc.

Source: Feldman Architecture, Inc.

Is there a favorite color you’d like to see enhancing the inside of your front door? Painting a door is a fairly simple one-day or weekend DIY job, depending on experience level. Here are the supplies and steps to get you on your way to a more colorful entry:

(Note: The steps will vary slightly depending on the door material and any previous paint, varnish or stain used on the door.)

Step 1. Begin by gathering your supplies: medium- and fine-grit sandpaper, tack cloth, painters tape, brush, adhesion primer and semigloss paint.
Step 2. Lightly sand the door to remove the top layer of varnish, paint or stain and give the surface a “tooth” for the primer to adhere to. Start with medium-grit sandpaper and finish with fine-grit; wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 3. Tape the door edges and any hardware, leaving only the surfaces to be painted exposed.
Step 4. Paint a layer of primer. Consider KILZ Adhesion Primer, designed to bond to a variety of tough-to-paint surfaces.
Step 5. Let the primer dry, then very lightly sand with fine-grit sandpaper.
Step 6. Wipe clean with tack cloth.
Step 7. Apply the first coat of paint. This may be enough in many cases, or, depending on the color used, a second coat may be required for optimal results. If so, repeat steps 5 and 6, followed by the second coat.

Related Articles:
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How to Paint Your Front Door
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How to Choose a Front Door Color

By: Vanessa Brunner, Houzz Editorial Staff

Don’t let your home blend into the background — even if you’re not in the market for changing your exterior color scheme, a new coat of paint on your front door could be just the makeover your home needs.

Use our color guides to each color to learn which hue, from unexpected orange to bright yellow to elegant black, will work well on your exterior door.

Miller's Meadow Farm Entry

Yellow. Welcome visitors with a cheerful yellow front door. Often identified with happiness, high energy and warmth, a lively yellow can brighten otherwise gloomy exteriors.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Yellow

Hickory Lane

Deep red. If bright red feels too audacious for your home, deepen the hue for a more crimson tone. More refined and sophisticated than brighter reds, certain shades of this deep red can work almost as neutrals.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Deep Red

5609 Residence

Orange. Orange is one of those colors that can go wrong really quickly. But don’t let that stop you — with the right complementing tones, small doses of orange can look quite modern and welcoming.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Orange

Block House

Green. Play off your surrounding landscape or introduce a new, refreshing color by painting your front door green. Whether olive, mint or lime, there’s bound to be a shade of green that can fit into your exterior palette.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Green

Arcadia Exterior Remodel

Black. Always classic, glossy black doors make an elegant statement. Use other exterior accents to help tie a black door into the rest of your home’s design.

Guide: When to Paint Your Door Black

More color guides: Color palettes, paint picks and more in the Houzz Color section

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Masonite Innovation Center Tour Cracks Open the Door to Science and Innovation

By Amy Flanigan, remodeling market manager

In the snowy suburbs of West Chicago lies the Masonite Innovation Center (MIC) – one of the world’s largest, private research and development facilities in the door industry.

A team of 60 scientists, industrial designers, mechanical engineers and lovers of all things Star Wars and llamas (among other things) work tirelessly to keep this behemoth 144,000 square foot facility running like a well-oiled machine. Collectively, these individuals bring a wide variety of experience to the table, ranging from expertise in tech and design, to careers of over 40 years in the building products industry. Although they come from different backgrounds and experiences, there’s one thing they all have in common – a passion and constant curiosity for imagining, designing and executing a better door.

In February, Sherry Winchester Schultz, president of the National Association of the Remodeling Industry (NARI) of Greater Chicagoland, joined other members of the Chicago chapter of NARI for a tour of the MIC.

“Masonite has been around a very long time. Yet, many of us in the trades know next to nothing about the company. Tradespeople are always looking for a product that provides appealing form and superior function at a great price, and is made in the US,” says Schultz.


Masonite recognizes its responsibility to arm remodelers and builders with product knowledge and tools that help position them as resources to their customers. While the DIY revolution helped bolster the homebuilding category, making it fun and trendy to personalize a home, it also resulted in a severe lack of trust from homeowners towards trade professionals—why would I hire someone to do this for me when I can just watch a video on YouTube and do it myself? Remodelers and builders need the support of manufacturers like Masonite now more than ever to help build back that trust and reinforce themselves as the experts.

When a trade professional is making a product recommendation to a homeowner, what sets one apart from a competitor is being able to communicate the quality behind the brand and the story behind the product. Having a valid reason for choosing one brand over another makes all the difference in the world to a customer. Masonite wants every trade professional who uses their doors to understand the forward-thinking design, rigorous testing, high-quality craftsmanship, and attention to detail that goes into each and every one of its products, which is a story well-told when taking the tour of the MIC.

“The majority of NARI’s members understand that the integrity of a door is important to their work, so that they don’t get call-backs. But to see the depth and breadth of testing and craftsmanship that goes into creating each door would help them to make their clients understand why they need to consider more than just price when selecting their interior and exterior doors,” says Schultz.

Kayleen McCabe, licensed contractor, former TV host of DIY’s Rescue Renovation, and NARI brand ambassador, also joined the tour in February and was both impressed and surprised by the level of science and testing a door goes through at the MIC.


“Using quality products makes all the difference. Having that level of research and care from Masonite in these doors makes it well worth the investment,” says McCabe.

For McCabe, Masonite communicating the science that goes into building a better door not only helps professionals see the bigger picture, but it also helps the next generation get excited about the trades.

“We’re up against a perception that working in the trades is very unskilled and blue collar. I want to communicate that you can be a part of building a home in a variety of ways – it’s creating art. If we don’t encourage this next generation, we won’t have people to support our infrastructure, which is why it’s so important to encourage a mind shift of the trades.”

McCabe feels that exposing the younger generation to facilities, such as the MIC, will reinforce the message that working in the trades doesn’t always equate to swinging a hammer – you can be an industrial designer, a mechanical engineer or a material scientist with a doctorate degree and all work collaboratively under the same roof.

“Visibility is the first step toward introducing students to vocational careers. In addition to putting the onus on school districts to take vocational training more seriously, real-life examples of vocational success can help students realize that real, relatable, and successful adults work with their hands,” says McCabe.

Fifty percent of the employees at the MIC have over 10 years of experience in their field of expertise, while the other half are comprised of new talent from outside the door industry and the next generation, bringing a set of unique and targeted skills to the table.

With this bimodal distribution of experience, the MIC has stacked the deck with the best and brightest, holding true to Masonite’s blueprint—a company rooted in knowledge leadership, design integrity, and cutting-edge technology and innovation at its core.

With its message and mission being spread throughout influential organizations like NARI, the MIC plans to continue to innovate and grow alongside the ever-changing landscape of the building products industry, providing trade professionals with well-designed, high quality products for many years to come.

See for yourself. Take a walk through the Masonite Innovation Center in the latest video below.

5 Bright Palettes for Front Doors

By Jennifer Ott, Houzz contributor, principal designer, Jennifer Ott Design

Nothing welcomes guests to your home better than a bold, beautiful color on the front door. Many people have no trouble picking out a fun color to paint the door, but don’t know what to do with the rest of the exterior. And what about the trim?

The key to working with bold colors is to limit them to elements you really want to stand out, which makes the front door the ideal place to feature a vibrant color. Then select supporting hues for the rest of the house that don’t try to compete for attention.

Check out these Houzz homes with delightfully colorful front doors, along with potential palettes that incorporate a bold front door hue with other exterior hues.

This acid yellow-green front door shouts “Come on in!” and works nicely with the natural wood siding. If you have no choice but to paint your siding, you could go with a cooler brown/taupe shade to set off the brighter hue of the door.

Example palette. Get the same effect with (clockwise from top left, all from Martha Stewart Living): Lagoon MSL125, Lamb MSL225 and Bayou MSL237.

Example palette: Clockwise from top left (all from Sherwin-Williams): Red Tomato SW6607, Iron Ore SW7069 and Cityscape SW7067.

Tell us: What color is your front door? What color would you like it to be?

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MAX: Design it. See it. Price it.

Virtual design tools are a terrific way for homeowners, designers, architects, builders and more to unleash their creativity and consider all the options. That’s why Masonite is excited to introduce the new Masonite Xpress (MAX) ConfiguratorSM, a web-based door design and pricing resource that’s easily accessible from most any computer or tablet.

The breakthrough technology of MAXSM allows dealers and their customers to virtually design doors while keeping an eye on the overall costs. Now dealers, builders, remodelers and interior designers can provide their customers with an instant quote while accelerating the design process. Continue reading